Which Countries Are Next For Medical Marijuana Legalization In 2021?

Which countries have been taking steps towards medical marijuana (MMJ) legalization that could potentially be finalized in 2021 or shortly after? This question is being asked by patients all over the world who would see a massive benefit in their quality of life if they could avail of medical marijuana treatment.

Medical marijuana is now proven beyond doubt to be a very effective treatment for a whole host of painful and debilitating conditions. Patients are getting a whole new lease on life thanks to MMJ treatment, which is extremely effective in pain management and symptom reduction.

MMJ can improve the symptoms of a large number of health conditions, such as epilepsy, headache, chronic pain, insomnia, glaucoma, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, Crohn’s disease, arthritis, seizures, nausea, and multiple sclerosis.

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Image by RexMedlen on Pixabay: Medical marijuana laws in 2021 will differ considerably around the world.

Medical Marijuana Legalization Around The World

Medical marijuana has been legalized in most US states. The minority of states in which MMJ is still illegal seem certain to follow suit over the next few years. The weight of evidence demonstrating the wide array of benefits of MMJ treatment is simply too compelling to ignore.

Plenty of other nations around the world have by now also legalized medical marijuana. Several countries have sensible, liberal MMJ programs that their citizens can avail of. But many countries have legal MMJ almost in name only, with limiting and restrictive laws that make MMJ available to only a minority of people with very specific medical conditions.

All of the countries that look like they may make more progress towards legalizing medical marijuana in 2021 fall into the category of having some amount of current MMJ legality. But that legality tends to involve such restrictive programs that almost none of their citizens qualify, and for those who do, the product range available is extremely limited.

Medical Marijuana Laws In 2021

Medical marijuana legalization is not usually a sudden, one-fell-swoop type of situation, especially when the decision is being made at a national level. Nations are large entities that contain a wide range of conflicting pressure groups within their borders.

In the US, for example, medical marijuana is still not legal at a federal level, but most US states have now legalized medical marijuana. Nations as a whole tend to move more slowly than individual states. For example, Oklahoma went from a staunchly anti-MMJ state to a very liberal legal MMJ state almost overnight, when voters approved State Question 788 in 2018.

Which Countries Will Legalize Medical Marijuana Next?

France

Sativex, which is a mouth spray containing chemical extracts from the cannabis plant, is currently available as a treatment in France. But a full medical marijuana program is yet to be legalized and implemented in the country.

Former Minister for Health Agnes Buzyn is an influential figure in French public health policy and has stated her support for an MMJ program on several occasions. Also, the French National Agency for the Safety of Medicines and Health Products has concluded that it would be “appropriate to authorize the use of therapeutic cannabis… in certain clinical situations.” Given these high-profile endorsements, it seems only a matter of time before France fully legalizes medical marijuana.

Ireland

The Irish Medical Cannabis Access Programme is operating on a pilot basis for the next five years. Only a medical consultant (and not a general practitioner) can prescribe a marijuana-based treatment. The only patients eligible for treatment with MMJ in Ireland are those with severe, treatment-resistant epilepsy; intractable nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy; or spasticity associated with MS who have not responded to standard treatments.

Ireland’s legal MMJ program is preliminary and very limited. However, it is a start, and seems likely to expand once the initial pilot stage is complete.

The UK

The UK technically legalized treatment with medicines derived from marijuana in 2018. But the country’s MMJ program has been derided for being MMJ-legal in name only. Only three MMJ derived medications are available to patients: Sativex (only for MS patients), Nabilone (only for treating chemotherapy side-effects), and Epidiolex (only for epilepsy patients). These medications are only prescribed if all other treatment options have failed.

Alex Fraser, patient access specialist at Grow Biotech, echoes the disillusionment felt by millions of UK citizens when he says, “We’ve seen a huge reluctance from doctors and pharmacies to risk their licenses by facilitating access. The vast majority of people (…) are still being forced to rely on the black market to source their medication.” Given the public outcry and strong demand for MMJ treatment in the UK, it is only a matter of time before the country widens and improves its MMJ laws.

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Image by pixundfertig on Pixabay: Which countries will legalize MMJ next?

Countries Where Recreational Marijuana Is Legal

Marijuana laws are somewhat unclear and indecisive in many countries. Some countries have fully legalized recreational marijuana. However, quite a few countries do not have a specific legal marijuana law, but have made marijuana usage effectively legal, with public marijuana consumption common and never punished.

The following is a list of countries in which recreational marijuana is legal, or effectively legal:

  • Argentina: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted.
  • Australia: Recreational marijuana was legalized in the Australian Capital Territory, which includes the capital city Canberra, in 2019.
  • Belgium: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted.
  • Cambodia: Technically illegal, but culturally accepted. Cambodia is full of restaurants offering “happy meals” that are infused with marijuana.
  • Canada: Fully legal recreational marijuana.
  • Colombia: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted.
  • Czech Republic: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted.
  • Ecuador: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted.
  • Mexico: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted.
  • Netherlands: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted, and products are available to buy in the country’s famous coffee shops.
  • Portugal: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted.
  • Spain: Recreational marijuana use is decriminalized and widely accepted. Spain’s famous “smoking clubs” are fully legal in Catalonia.
  • United States: Several states have fully legalized recreational marijuana.
  • Uruguay: Fully legal recreational marijuana.

Featured image by Kyle Glenn on Unsplash

How and Why the State of New York Legalized Medical Marijuana

Medical marijuana has been legal in the U.S. since 1996 — if you live in California that is. For other states, it’s been an uphill battle to legalize medical cannabis, and for some, the battle rages on. As of May 2017, medical marijuana is legal in 29 states, and several others allow the use of marijuana in its oil form, with limitations on THC content (i.e., the psychoactive component of the drug).

Even where medical cannabis is legalized, the medical marijuana laws regarding its use vary wildly from state to state. The legalization of marijuana for recreational use is also shifting rapidly across the U.S., muddying the waters on medical marijuana laws and marijuana usage as a whole.

Although California is leading the charge on both fronts, especially when it comes to medical marijuana, over on the East Coast, the traditionally liberal and progressive New York has put in place a surprisingly restrictive and limited medical cannabis program. The state became the 23rd in the U.S. to embrace medical marijuana when it was made legal in mid-2014 under an act known as the Compassionate Care Act, signed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

At the beginning of his tenure, Cuomo announced plans to introduce medical marijuana legally to the state but was also noted and criticized for his long-held anti-marijuana position. Although Cuomo stated he was receptive to change on the medical marijuana front and approached the subject with an open mind, many feared that his medical marijuana laws would be too strict.

Medical Marijuana Laws in New York

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The state became the 23rd in the U.S. to embrace medical marijuana when it was made legal in mid-2014 under an act known as the Compassionate Care Act, signed by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

These fears turned out to be well-founded upon the introduction of the CCA, which contained a critical clause that allows the New York Department of health to pull the plug on the medical marijuana program any time it chooses.

The list of qualifying conditions is also fairly short compared to other states, with only severe illnesses entitling patients to medical cannabis. On top of this, doctors can be punished under federal law for suppling marijuana to a patient who doesn’t fit the required conditions.

The narrow qualifying conditions include cancer, ALS and other motor neuron diseases, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and AIDS. This means that only around 10 percent of patients who could benefit from marijuana can actually legally avail of it, which is seen by many as far too restrictive.

The number of dispensaries allowed statewide is also pretty narrow, with only up to 20 dispensaries being grated licenses and only five manufacturers being granted the permission to grow marijuana. For as state composed of just under 20 million people, this seems relatively minuscule to medical marijuana advocates.

No Smoking Medical Cannabis in New York

Another measure that is seen as overly harsh, particularly when compared to other states, is the decision to forbid the smoking of medical marijuana, the most traditional method of taking the medicine. This is regarded as another attempt to appear anti-marijuana by the overly conservative Cuomo.

But it considerably limits patients’ methods and ease with which to avail of their medicine. As it stands, patients are only allowed to consume medical marijuana through vaporization, oils, foods and pills, which is, unfortunately, not the cheapest ways to consume the drug — or the most effective.

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In New York, you can’t legally smoke medical marijuana.

Smoking marijuana has traditionally been held as the quickest way to avail of the drug’s effects. When it comes to chronic and severe pain relief, most patients will want their medicine to work as quick as possible, forcing them to illegally smoke it or purchase a vaporizer, costing them hundreds of dollars on top of the amount they’ve already paid for the medicine. Cuomo and his supporters argued that smoking is not in the interest of public health, but this particular decree is seen by many as yet another attempt by Cuomo to straddle the line.

Just before the bill’s introduction in 2014, the governor spoke about the upcoming legislation.

“We’re going to be sending up a bill shortly that we believes strikes the right balance,” he said.

It was the result of near-constant pressure from medical marijuana advocates, lead by Sen. Diane Savino, the Senate sponsor of the bill, and Assembly sponsor Richard Gottfried. Assemblyman Gottfried admitted the bill was a compromise and also expressed concerns about the projected 18-month implication, concerns which turned out to be largely unfounded as the program got up and running on schedule.

It was a thorny path to medical marijuana legalization in New York, but now that it’s here, hopefully, things can continue to improve. There are certainly signs of it, with advocates campaigning for new conditions to be added to the list of qualifiers. Just recently post-traumatic stress disorder was accepted on the list, expanding some horizons in that sense. At the end of last year, the state Department of Health announced that it will be lifting and revising growth limits due to increased pressure from advocates and patients alike. All in all, things look good for the future of medical marijuana in New York.

The Most Medical Marijuana-friendly Countries in the World

In California, medical marijuana card holders are blessed when it comes to how the state views MMJ. Not only does the Golden State have some of the laxest medical marijuana laws in the country, but it is also only mere months away from legalizing the plant for MMJ card holders and recreational users alike.

Although Californians have a tendency to see their state as the center of the universe, it is not the only place that has such open-minded medical marijuana laws. Countries all around the world have similar laws whereby MMJ card holders gets to enjoy the same type of freedom you get here at home. Let’s take a whirlwind tour of the most medical marijuana-friendly countries in the world

The Netherlands

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Amsterdam has long been lauded for its relaxed attitude toward medical marijuana.

Where else could you start except for in the weed capital of the world? This northern European country has long been lauded for its relaxed attitude toward marijuana in general and medical marijuana in particular. It should come as no surprise that the Netherlands’ medical marijuana program is probably the best in the world with huge amounts of government money going toward research to better it even further. MMJ users in the Netherlands have two options when it comes to obtaining the plant: informally from a recreational dispensary or formally through a pharmacy. Accessing marijuana in the Netherlands is as easy as you’re going to find anywhere else in the world with about 700 weed dispensing “coffee shops” spanning the country.

Jamaica

Jamaica is seen by some as the beating heart of the global marijuana community; however,  for a country with such a prolific and well-documented history of promoting the plant’s recreational use, Jamaica only actually decriminalized the possession of marijuana in 2015. Nowadays, with the bureaucratic nightmare of decriminalization behind them, Jamaica is every ounce the MMJ mecca that it has always been believed to be. It even has a cannabis licensing authority that is in charge of the cultivation and distribution of the plant for medical and scientific purposes. Although MMJ is not easily accessible to everyone in Jamaica, if you have your California medical marijuana card on you when you’re traveling to the country, you can get a permit in the airport for a few dollars that will allow you to consume MMJ wherever you want.

Uruguay

Uruguay hit the headlines in 2013 for becoming the first country in the world to completely legalize marijuana, which destroyed the country’s powerful drugs cartels. In Uruguay, you’re welcome to grow up to six plants of your own at home or acquire some from the state-controlled marijuana dispensary program — and you don’t need a medical marijuana card to do so. Although this program has had some teething problems, nowadays, the price for MMJ is so low that everyone can afford it, which means that those in vital need of its healing powers can access it easily. Uruguay has been somewhat of a trailblazer on the South American weed scene. Since the legalization of the plant in 2013, Chile and Colombia have followed suit, and more are set to follow.

Canada

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Canada has had a medical marijuana program since 2001.

Our northerly neighbors may not have total legalization yet — they’re working on it! — but they do have a pretty great medical marijuana program that has been in place since 2001. In order to obtain a medical marijuana card in Canada, you must have a diagnosis and a recommendation for MMJ use from a licensed physician. Then you can acquire the plant from any of the 29 licensed producers who are accessible from every corner of the country. According to recent data, about 29,000 Canadians are now benefiting from the wonder plant.

Israel

Believe it or not, Israel is also a trailblazer when it comes to medical marijuana research. It was an Israeli scientist who was one of the first researchers to identify cannabidol (CBD) and who later determined the structure of tetrahyrdocannabidiol (THC). Ever since the 1960s, the small Middle Eastern country has been refining the study of the plant, and in 1992, it approved marijuana for medical use. Today, around 25,000 Israeli patients use the plant to treat a whole host of ailments.

Denmark

Although MMJ is not widely accepted through the entire Scandinavian country — you could see yourself slapped with a fine for openly consuming outside of the Christiania district of Copenhagen — the Danish attitudes to cannabis are pretty lax. Medical marijuana has been legal in Denmark since 2011, and all you need is a prescription to legally acquire and consume it. Although only three types of cannabis are legal for medical use — sativex, marinol and nabilone — a whopping 88 percent of Danish people are in favor of the total legalization of all types of medical marijuana.

As attitudes start to become more liberal and more parts of the world start to open their eyes to the wonders of medical marijuana, you’ll begin to see more countries become havens for both MMJ card holders and recreational users. Unfortunately, some areas have quite a long way to go when it comes to marijuana acceptance, but overall, the world seems to be moving in a more weed-friendly direction than ever before.

What the New Bills in the House and Senate Mean for Medical Marijuana in Florida

In November 2016, Florida voters approved Amendment 2, which took effect in January 2017. The controversial amendment formed part of the Florida Marijuana Legalization Initiative and was designed to extend the rights of patients, allowing for more potent strains of medical marijuana in Florida to become available and to be used in the treatment of a wider variety of medical conditions.

However, since this amendment has passed, and with just one month to go in the session, Florida lawmakers remain at odds as to how to carry out and put into practice the new amendment. Senate and House members disagree on the finer details of how to expand access to the drug, from licensing additional distributors to cover the increase in demand to requiring patients to be seen by the same doctor for at least three months prior to receiving their prescription.

What Does Amendment 2 Mean for Medical Marijuana In Florida?

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Amendment 2 means higher-strength strains of medical marijuana will be allowed in Florida.

Under Amendment 2, medical marijuana use will expand beyond the limited prescription of low-strength strains allowed under the 2014 law. The new legislation also expands the list of ailments that qualify for a medical marijuana prescription from cancer, epilepsy and chronic muscle spasms to include post-traumatic stress disorder, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, glaucoma, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and potentially other chronic conditions.

It is still yet to be determined whether the new amendment will expand the rights of patients to choose how they would like to ingest their medication. Currently, patients are only allowed topical lotions with vaping being permitted only in the cases of terminally ill patients. This means that smoking, consuming edibles (brownies, gummies, lollipops etc.) and taking tinctures are still illegal with or without a legal prescription.

What Bills Concerning Medical Marijuana in Florida Are Being Debated?

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Follow SB 406 and HB 1397 to keep tabs on medical marijuana in Florida.

There are two major bills at play: Senate Bill 406, sponsored by Sen. Rob Bradley, is viewed as more permissive and has drawn support from advocates in the medical marijuana community. House Bill 1397, sponsored by Rep. Ray Rodrigues, has been criticized for being overly restrictive and is heavily backed by the Drug Free America Foundation.

What Do These Bills Aim To Achieve?

SB 406 would eliminate the current requirement that states that patients are required to be under a specific doctor’s care for at least three months prior to receiving a prescription for medical marijuana in Florida. HB 1397 would keep such restrictions in place, something that the medical marijuana community claims will outprice many of the patients who could benefit from the prescription.

Doctors are already experiencing a significant influx of new patients eager to qualify for medical marijuana prescriptions. As of now, there are currently seven dispensaries licensed to sell medical marijuana in Florida. SB 406 would immediately expand the number of licenses issued to medical marijuana distributors in the state to allow for the rapid increase in demand. HB 1397 would first require that more 250,000 patients sign up for medical marijuana in Florida before expanding the pool by an additional five businesses. This pool would continue to increase when sign-ups reach 350,000; 400,000; and every 100,000 patients thereafter.

SB 406 would also establish a coalition for medical marijuana research through Tampa’s H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute and would require that an independent laboratory test all medical marijuana for quality and potency before it is made available to patients. Given the federal government’s previous troubles in producing medical-grade marijuana for patients, these last amendments have received a warm welcome by the medical marijuana community.

What Will Happen If Lawmakers Can’t Agree?

Amendment 2 states that the new legislation for medical marijuana in Florida must be adopted by the state by June 3, 2017, at the latest. If the Senate and House can’t agree on a workable bill by the end of the session May 5, then the health department will be required to issue the regulation on its own. This would make the new legislation much more vulnerable in terms of various legal challenges and would ostensibly leave the issue in the hands of the courts.

Stay tuned for further news on medical marijuana in Florida and what the new legislation will mean for patients’ right to access, conditions that will qualify for use of medical marijuana, different ways to dose with MMJ legally, and the different strains that will become available and how best to use them. In the meantime, if you’re curious about medical marijuana, its benefits and the rights of patients in other areas of the country, then check out the other articles on our extensive blog.

 

Beginners: How to Grow Your Own Medical Marijuana

With a California medical marijuana card, you are legally entitled to grow six marijuana plants in your own home. Although this doesn’t sound like a huge amount, it’s a lot more than the one you’ll be able to grow legally without the card in 2018 when Prop 64 goes into effect. With six plants, you can produce a significant amount of weed — definitely more than enough for personal use. In this article, we’ll explore some medical marijuana growing tips for newbies and walk you through how you can start to grow your own once you have your MMJ card.

Buy Seeds

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You can find medical marijuana seeds at your local weed dispensary.

Like any other plant, there are numerous ways to grow medical marijuana, and there are a lot of things that can go wrong with the growth process. If you’re not prepared and don’t look after your plants, prevent pests and nourish your marijuana plants, they will die. The first thing you’ll need to do is to procure some medical marijuana seeds. You can find them at your local weed dispensary. At the dispensary, you’ll get advice on how many seeds you’ll need and suggestions for growing methods. All you’ll need to do is decide what method works best for you.

Plant Them

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Rock wool or coco fiber will help your medical marijuana grow.

The easiest method is simply to use plain dirt and grow the medical marijuana in your backyard. Since the introduction of medical marijuana cards, this has become a more common method and one that many people use on a regular basis. It is also by far the most common way for beginners to start growing their own weed. It’s important to remember that you have to have a secure backyard with a fence that locks to ensure you don’t break California law.

The main advantage for growing in dirt is that it is the cheapest way to start and you can find fertilizers from local garden stores that will do a good job. The main disadvantage is you can’t be sure of soil quality and may get a bad crop of medical marijuana as a result. If using normal soil, you’ll need to make sure that the plants are exposed to lots of natural light (luckily, California has a lot of it) and are watered on a regular basis to ensure healthy growth.

Other growers like to use rock wool or coco fiber. The best way to think about these methods is to think about growing your medical marijuana with a high-quality bespoke soil. This is slightly more expensive than using the soil found in your backyard, but you’ll face a lot fewer issues when it comes to the quality of the crop. You’ll have to find coco fiber or rock wool, but if you live in a big town or have a good dispensary nearby, you won’t have an issue with procuring either.

Try Aeroponics

A more advanced technique is to use aeroponics to grow medical marijuana indoors. Although we don’t recommend this to first-time growers, it is something that you might be able to graduate to in the future. This method consists of hanging the plants in mesh baskets in the air. You’ll be required to spray the roots of the medical marijuana with a mix of water and fertilizer on a daily basis, usually numerous times per day. This is a more labor-intensive method, and simple mistakes, such as not getting the pH just right, can ruin an entire crop. However, the results when done well are stunning. This can be the fastest and most effective way of growing marijuana, resulting in the highest yields.   

Consider Indoor vs Outdoor

Once you decide on your growing method, the next most important thing to think about is whether you’re going to grow your plants indoors or outdoors. Both have pros and cons. It is common in the weed community to think that indoor growth is better, but this is largely down to the years that cannabis was strictly illegal when most people, for security’s sake, were forced to grow their cannabis indoors. This isn’t to say that there aren’t numerous benefits for growing indoors — the most common being complete control of your growing environment. This means you can control the temperature, light, carbon dioxide and humidity of your growing environment. Of course, in order to do that, you’ll need to buy all the lights and equipment. A truly effective growth environment can cost thousands of dollars.

Outdoor growth isn’t exactly free, but it’s certainly substantially cheaper than growing your weed indoors. If you choose to grow outdoors, you have to bear in mind that you are at the mercy of nature. Whether it’s flooding, drought, or a pesky animal or person stealing your plants, there is a range of issues with outdoor growth that you’ll never have to face when growing indoors.

Once you have your medical marijuana card and are experimenting with growing your own weed for the first time, try to grow outdoors first. This will allow you to experiment with low-cost materials and discover if growing your own weed is right for you. You could eventually decide to upgrade to an indoor growth environment, or you may hate the process of growing marijuana altogether. If that’s the case, you’ll have saved some money and will be able to purchase weed from your local dispensary instead. Neither choice is the wrong one when it comes to medical marijuana.  

Proposition 64: Is Everybody Happy About Legalizing Marijuana?

In the past century, marijuana has gone from a legal and ubiquitous crop to an illegal substance to a decriminalized one. From there, it has once again become legal, first for medical use and now for recreational use in California through Proposition 64. So with things changing so quickly, is everyone happy?

The short answer is no. Rapid change often brings about resistance. Only time can tell whether this resistance is a knee-jerk response to change or something triggered by fundamental beliefs. In this article, we will be figuring out whether everyone is happy about legalizing marijuana.

If you haven’t already, be sure to buy your medical marijuana card online. Let’s get into it!

On Nov. 9, 2016, the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, also known as Proposition 64, became law with an approval rate of 57 percent. This initiative was set in place to legalize the adult use of cannabis in California. For many people who had been fighting the war on drugs, the 9th of November was marked as a monumental victory. 

But what about the 43 percent who voted against legalizing marijuana? Are they happy? Do they want to prohibit the use of cannabis across the board? Well, the surface level answer to the first question is no and to the second question is yes, but let’s dig a little deeper and see if we can discover if that really is the case, and if so, why.

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Will Proposition 64 continue the war on drugs, or will it end it?

Cannabis was first labeled as a poison in 1906, and following many subsequent restrictions, it became prohibited across America by the mid-1930s. To say that state law has some impact on its people’s opinions and ideals is a huge understatement. Although many people continued to grow and use marijuana after it was made illegal, it became progressively more denigrated, and its users were looked at with disdain. Gangs ceased the opportunity to make money off of what the government refused to, so the buying and selling of marijuana were further sullied. 

Of those between 18 and 34 years old, 71 percent are in favor of legal marijuana. Compare this with the 35 percent of senior citizens age 65 and older in favor of legalization. Those over 65 would have been born in 1951 or earlier, so for their entire lives, marijuana would have been illegal and controlled by gangs. Gangs bring about violence and poor-quality drugs. This certainly would have negatively impacted cannabis’s public standing.

Also, there were far fewer studies showing the medical efficacy of the drug in the early and mid-20th century and far more media outlets reporting on its supposed dangers. All of this would have has quite the formative effect on people’s opinions. This group accounts for the vast majority of people who voted no on Proposition 64.

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Older voters weren’t in favor of Proposition 64.

Certainly, some of those who voted no see the many benefits of marijuana — both medicinally and fiscally — but they fear that legalization may be one step too far. They may be happy with the decriminalization and medical use of marijuana, but they also believe having no control over who buys or sells marijuana has its drawbacks. Whether they remain discontent about the result will depend on the outcome of the legislation.

When they see a reduction in opioid abuse and overdose and see that the percentage of the population who uses cannabis remains steady regardless of how the law views the drug — both have been shown consistently in other states that legalize marijuana for recreational use — they are likely to be convinced.

If they see the government able to help those who require rehabilitation after addiction to cannabis and if they can keep mental illness levels at least on par with what they have been in previous years, then we cannot see why anyone wouldn’t be supportive. The data is fairly conclusive in stating that the legalization of marijuana does not increase usage and allows those who need help to receive it without judgment. It also proves incredibly profitable for the government, which in turn allows for more funding for education, emergency services, health care and transportation.

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Like weed, alcohol was once illegal in the U.S.

At this point, you should have a fair idea about how Californian’s feel about legalizing marijuana. It has been almost a century since the criminalization of marijuana, so Proposition 64 is an important point in history regardless of where any one person stands. If you think back to the Prohibition era, you’ll remember that even alcohol was at one point illegal in America. Now, it is as ubiquitous as soda and has garnered the acceptance of the general public to the point where you are judged more for not drinking than you are for drinking! We believe this is where things are headed for marijuana. Change is slow, but things are moving in the right direction. Marijuana won’t be legalized in California until 2018, so if you want marijuana beforehand, you’ll need a medical marijuana card. So get your medical marijuana card online today!

Why Weed Legalization is Sweeping the United States

The times have certainly changed. Two decades ago, California legalized medical marijuana. They were the first state to do so. Many saw the Californians as liberal, free-spirits at the time. No one predicted what would happen next—that weed legalization would sweep all across the United States.

Nowadays, it’s hard to look at a map of the United States without noticing how many states have followed suit and legalized medical marijuana. Some have even legalized recreational use, too. Currently, 25 states have legalized medical marijuana. Four of those states have legalized recreational use, too.

Why is Weed So Popular These Days?

There are a number of reasons why marijuana has taken the United States by storm over these last two decades. Americans have been consuming cannabis for decades, but legal consumption is a recent phenomenon. Here’s why weed legalization is on the rise:

  • Safety First: Many studies have come out in the last decade showing that marijuana is actually not that bad for the body. Studies have shown that the drug has limited negative effects, especially consumed in social situations. Additionally, the idea weed will lead children down the wrong path has been disproven by a number of studies. Myths have been destroyed and mainstream acceptance is in vogue.
  • No More Hypocrisy: It’s hard to make a case for the legalization of alcohol and then state that marijuana should not be legal. Drinking booze shows greater negative effects on society than marijuana consumption. So many individuals realize while they enjoy having a few beers every now and then, others enjoying smoking a blunt on occasion.
  • The Math Works: Weed legalization benefits a state’s bottom line. Once the weed industry is legalized in a state, that government can then tax the living daylights out of marijuana sales. Colorado recently legalized recreational use. The next year, the state saw over $135 million in tax revenues from marijuana. That’s a huge boost to any state’s bottom line!
  • Medical Marijuana Benefits: Before you go get your weed card in California for fun, you need to realize medical marijuana has numerous benefits when treating different ailments. Cancer, AIDS, depression, anxiety, seizures and more can all be treated with marijuana. It’s not phony science. Many studies have shown the vast medical benefits of the drug.

Visit Medical Marijuana Doctors in California

Before you visit medical marijuana doctors in California, you must know there’s an easier way to get your weed card. Just get on MMJRecs and you can have your doctor recommendation in less than ten minutes. It’s truly that easy! Get with the weed trend sweeping over the United States and start consuming cannabis today.

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